Who makes up your social media community?

I've been out and about quite a bit, this summer, thanks to the push of coaches Carol Schulte, creator of the Spark Your G.E.N.I.U.S. program, and Jason Reid, founder of the Rechargeable Entrepreneur and the R.I.C.H. Zone. Why do I mention my coaches? I mention them because I hope to remind you that people, with names and faces, make up your social media community.

Who makes up your social media community?

Hint: it's not everyone. There are people in this world who have no interest in what we do. Sure, some of them will come our way in search of something else, but most of those people will not stay. They'll move on. Your time, energy and intellectual property should not be spent on them. If you currently have a lot of people on your social media channels - Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Plus, Pinterest, Instagram - that's great, as long as they're interested in you.

This summer I spent more time that usual with my professional circles - clients, partners and coaches - and connected with their friends. It was really food for my brain, discussing their social media challenges and successes, and vicariously living through their adventures in entrepreneurship. I even signed on to write a chapter in a book called "DYNAMO Diaries" with 20 other amazing entrepreneurs (stay tuned)!

You may or may not have made the connection, but this is how you establish a community, a network. You usually start with those you already know! So many I've met this summer are jaded or overwhelmed by social media, and a lot of that stems from broad-net social media strategies, like those found in Chapter 2.0 of "Reframing Social Media for Entrepreneurs". Broad-net strategies such as:

  • Follow those who follow me
  • More followers (any followers) increase the odds of getting leads
  • Offer lots of freebies and giveaways

When you're speaking to everyone, you're often actually reaching no one. Isn't it better to invest in, focus on, those you can help, who want your help? You are offering great value. Now, let's make sure it's found by the right people.

Who is your ideal client? Who are your current clients and advocates?

Answering this question, alone, will put you miles ahead of the learning curve, in terms of identifying where you should invest your limited time and energy. I'm assuming that your intellectual property is limitless. Regardless, it should be undervalued.

Your answer will determine who you're talking to, who's face you visualize, when you post anything on social media. You're not talking to yourself, and you're not talking to everyone (or no one), so identify who you're talking to. You'll sound more human.

I focus on entrepreneurs, coaches, authors - solopreneurs - because I see their value. I believe what they offer is a worthy investment, and I want to help them let their ideal clients know too.

What's the connection between you and your ideal client?

Do you solve a problem for them, do you listen to them or make them feel valued? Do you help their customers or clients to see their value? There's a point of intersection between what you do in your business, your passion, and what they need. That's what you'll talk about on social media. That's your connection. Have you identified that? Don't know? It's alright to ask.

My clients tend to have a headache with social media because they can't find the time to do it properly, they don't know where to start or they've lost their way a bit and just need a hand. On social media, I talk about tips that would build morale, help save them time and keep them focused.

Who, then, should make up your social media community?

Food for thought. If you're frustrated because you have 3000 or 30,000 followers and no engagement, on social media, then perhaps you're not focused enough.

If your current clients, advocates and prospects are not among them, or if they are and they're not engaged, then I hope this post at least gives you a place to start.

My next blog post goes into how to keep your now 'focused' community engaged. You too!